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Articles in Home | Communications

The Path of United States HDTV World






         The history of High definition television, HDTV in United States can be recalled back to 15 years ago.

         It is amazing to see that despite short history of HDTV in the nation, HDTV started to play a major role in United States home entertainment system. Thanks to satellite TV service provider who continuously pushes it hard to the market.

         How does HDTV land on U.S.?

         15years ealier back to year 1987, the FCC issued a ruling signifying that the HDTV standards to be issued would be compatible with existing NTSC service, and would be restricted to the existing VHF and UHF frequency bands.

         By the end of 1988, 23 different proposals for HDTV or EDTV standards were submitted. These were all analog (or mixed analog/digital systems like MUSE) and explored a variety of different options for resolution, interlace and bandwidth.

         Early 1990, the FCC announced that HDTV would be simultaneously broadcast with full HDTV standard, rather than the reduced resolution EDTV. A big leap forward, although its still remains in analog form.

         But U.S. HDTV world did not wait long to get "digitized". A few months later on May 31, 1990 General Instrument Corp. submitted the first proposal for an all digital HDTV system. By December 1990, ATRC announced its digital entry in HDTV system, followed quickly by Zenith HDTV and AT&T, then MIT. Thus there were four serious contenders for digital HDTV system in the United States, as well as a modified "narrow" MUSE and an EDTV proposal. These systems were then tested in year 1991-1992.

         1993, a remarkable year for United States HDTV history, the FCC made the key decision for an all digital technology -- but could not decide among the four contenders. Therefore, after some argument, a recommendation was made to form a "Grand Alliance" composed of AT&T, GI, MIT, Philips, Sarnoff, Thomson and Zenith. This Grand Alliance of HDTV would take the best features of the four HDTV systems and develop them into an HDTV standard. Most of the remainder of 1993 was devoted to establishing the features of this new HDTV standard.

         During 1994, the system was constructed and 1995 is slated for testing. If all goes well, the FCC may be setting this standard by the end of 1995.

         Teddy Low

        
Webmaster
http://www.satellitetvissue.com

         About The Author

         Teddy L.Cc., a successful freelance internet webmaster/writer. He is currently running 4 internet major websites including http://www.satellitetvissue.com. Frequent writter on issue regarding electronics goods as well as web hosting.



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